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Knowledge management strategies in the organization

The knowledge management strategy must be in line with the development of the organization's strategy because it must represent an organizational competitive strategy. Global and business strategies of companies are based on human resources and the necessary knowledge to convert input into output. Therefore, for the successful implementation of the knowledge management strategy in the organization, it is necessary to adjust the strategies to the available knowledge in the organization.



What does a knowledge management strategy have to meet?

There are several criteria that a knowledge management strategy must meet. First, it should identify and address problems related to business process efficiency. In doing so, if the purpose of the strategy is to obtain information for solving problems in the domain of individual work tasks, then it is necessary to design certain benchmarks, which could be used as a benchmark and to ultimately determine the extent to which information contributed to solving a particular problem. Certainly, the knowledge management process should also include criteria for identifying and assessing future crises, allocating resources, and improving business effectiveness. Lastly, the knowledge management strategy should be designed to encourage individual and group learning.


The path of knowledge

The transfer of knowledge itself is not as simple as it seems at first. Namely, the acquired knowledge needs to be coded, made available using a set of rules. The process of codification is possible for explicit knowledge, and in the case of implicit knowledge, it is slow and made possible by socialization. Since implicit knowledge is synonymous with experiential, it is best conveyed by observing a person. Then, the knowledge needs to be mapped, modeled, and "stored" for later use.


Five phases of knowledge management in an organization

Thus, knowledge management involves five phases. The first phase refers to the acquisition of knowledge, its collection from various sources. The second phase relates to the storage of knowledge on the media, and the third phase relates to data processing, which includes sorting, filtering, organizing, analyzing, and the like. The fourth phase involves the exchange of knowledge, which can be done through information systems or direct communication. The last, fifth phase, refers to the use of knowledge to solve problems and achieve the goals of the organization.



Sources:

  1. Firestone, J., and McElroy, M. W. (2005). DEFINING KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT OR NOT KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT? THAT IS THE QUESTION. Strategic Direction, 21(10), 22-24.

  2. Rupčić, N. and Žic, M. (2012). UPRAVLJANJE ZNANJEM –SUVREMENA SRŽNA KOMPETENCIJA. Praktični menadžment, 3(2), 21-28.

  3. Seng, C. V. et al. (2002). THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT TO WORKPLACE LEARNING. Journal of workplace learning, 14(4), 138-147.

  4. Uit Beijerse, R. P. (1999). QUESTIONS IN KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT: DEFINING AND CONCEPTUALISING A PHENOMENON. Journal of knowledge Management, 3(2), 94-109.

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